Category Archives: Museums

California Campcation: Glass Mountain, Modoc Indian War, and Petroglyphs

When I last left off, I had shared our caving and camping adventures in California. But that’s not all! There was so much more to see. As I mentioned before, this area of northern California has some of the most fascinating and unique geology that I have seen.

One morning, we set out to find the Glass Mountain of Brandon’s childhood. When we did find it, I do not think it quite lived up to his memories, but I found it astounding nonetheless. Despite it being July, we ran into some snow on the road that my little Civic could not surmount. Not one to let a little snow deter us, we pulled the car out of the way and set out on foot.

Like much of the landscape in the area, Glass Mountain developed as the result of a lava flow. It gets its name because much of the rock that formed it is made of shiny obsidian. It is impossible to capture the scale of the place. Once on top of the black mountain, the rock stretches almost endlessly in every direction. After taking in the vastness of it all, attention turns to the details – how each rock has its own form and pattern.

Don’t miss the butterfly in this photo

Although the snow would belie this fact, it got hot and we were both thankful we had arrived in the morning. We finished up our hike on and around the obsidian mountain and spent the remainder of the day relaxing (see previous post and the picture of Brandon floating in the lake – that pretty much sums it up).

Our final morning, we packed up the car, but we were not nearly done with our trip. We spent the morning learning the history of Captain Jack and the Modoc Indian War. This was a timely reminder of the ugly history of this country we sometimes try to gloss over or ignore. It may be easier to look the other way, but confronting this history and remembering this history is important. This is a history where people, because of the color of their skin and their beliefs, were forced off their land, the place that was their home, because people with a different color skin and different set of beliefs were powerful enough to do so. This is a history that should not, must not be forgotten.

The war began in November 1872 when a handful of Modoc Indians decided to move back to their home. This set off a series of conflicts between the Indians and white settlers. Eventually, a group of Indians led by Captain Jack retreated to the lava beds where they were joined by others. There were 50 – 60 warriors and their families who made a stand here. Later named Captain Jack’s Stronghold, this area of lava bed was home for this group of people for months of fighting against a vastly larger US Army. The war ended in June of the following year with the defeat of the Modoc Indians. Captain Jack and other leaders were hanged and most remaining Modoc who were at the stronghold were relocated to Oklahoma – a place so very far from their home. As we walked these places where such a tragedy had occurred, I could only hope that we have learned to do better, to be better as a country and as human beings.

At both Gillam’s Camp (where the US army camped) and Captain Jack’s Stronghold, there were brochures that provided the history of the war through a self-guided walking tour. I made Brandon stop at every number and we took turns reading the information. And he still wants to marry me. He hasn’t been to too many museums with me, though. Yet. I might hold off on that until it’s too late for him to back out.

A tribute to Captain Jack

Our final stop before going home was Petroglyph Point. Separate from but also a part of the National Monument, this rock formation used to be an island. The nearby Tule Lake used to cover this entire area. All along this formation were petroglyphs, some of which were carved as much as 6,000 years ago.

This was completely worth a stop.

This weekend had it all! We camped, we hiked, we learned, and we saw some things that were just plain cool. If you are a person living in southern Oregon or northern California, this is an easy weekend trip that I highly recommend.

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Brandon’s Birthday Break, 30th Bday Ed., cont’d

Brandon turned 30 and it was a thing that needed to be celebrated, celebrated with all the fun things and adventures that could possibly fit into a single week. And so I planned and obsessed and refined and expanded. The end result was an incredible week in Washington.

I previously shared the places we stayed, but that was only the beginning, the background against which all the other pieces could fall into place. And oh what pieces they were.

To begin, skydiving.  You may remember that the details of this trip were a complete surprise to Brandon, who discovered what was next as we went along. That was how we found ourselves having this conversation over a lovely breakfast on a rainy Sunday morning in Olympia:

Me: So you’re probably wondering what we are doing in Olympia.

B: Well, yeah. I can’t remember ever mentioning a desire to come to Olympia.

Me: It’s more about the proximity to what we are doing today than actually being in Olympia. You remember that time you said you wanted to go skydiving? (picture a slightly maniacal smile slowly forming on my face)

B: (worried silence)

Me: Yeah, I think it was when we were in Hawaii or something. You said you really wanted to go skydiving. So you’re going skydiving today. I have reservations for you this morning.

B: You keep saying “you’re going skydiving.” Don’t you mean “we’re going skydiving.”

Me: (worried silence)

B: I’m not going to go skydiving by myself! I only want to go if you go with me. If we die, we die together!

Me: Ummm…. I hadn’t really planned on joining you. I mean, the cost is so much more for two people.

After several minutes of somewhat tense negotiation, it was determined that if, in fact, Brandon was going skydiving today, so was I. As we discussed the impending “fun” we would be having, we halfheartedly bemoaned the weather and “worried” that perhaps the rainy day would prevent us from jumping.

As we both kept pretending that we actually really wanted to skydive, we made our way toward Skydive Kapowsin. I think we were both secretly relieved when the worsening weather meant that it was not a good day to jump out of an airplane.

Hiding our relief, we began forming a Plan B. Fortunately, it just happened to be the weekend for Bainbridge Island’s Wine on the Rock. The weekend event is a coordinated effort among the handful of wineries on the island featuring tastings and charcuterie at each stop. We bought our tickets at the first vineyard we visited, Eleven Winery.

After enjoying the wine and live music offered there, we took our souvenir wine glasses and the handy event map and began making our way down the island, stopping at several vineyards and wineries along the way.

Not only were the wine and food fantastic, we got to learn about the unique wine industry and culture of the island, which is shaped by the rainy and cool weather (read: we drank lots of white wine).

Our favorite was a perfectly tart raspberry dessert wine we purchased at Perennial Vintners. In fact, as I type this, we are planning to open it up tonight to serve along side creme brûlée (I am weirdly excited about breaking in the kitchen mini torch) to celebrate Brandon’s hard work refinishing the original hardwood floors in my house. Seems like a worthy event for the wine! We did not quite make it to all the vineyards, one of us had to drive after all, but it was the perfect way to spend our first day of vacation. And I think we both enjoyed it more than we would have enjoyed skydiving.

Good thing Sunday was such a relaxing day. Because the following day was anything but, in the best way possible. Monday was Seattle day. With our VRBO chosen partly for location, we were able to get an early start that day with a brisk walk to the ferry. We spent the day exploring Seattle by foot, as evidenced by the new record I would set for steps according to my FitBit.

We began our day in Pike Place Market, stopping by some of my favorite spots.

Which pretty much means we spent the morning eating food. Lots of food.

After thoroughly enjoying the sights, smells, sounds, and tastes of the market, we made our way toward the Pacific Science Center.

Unfortunately we did not have time to see the entire museum, but Brandon was especially interested in the special Sherlock Holmes Exhibit. The exhibit provided a history of the Sherlock Holmes series, including some of Arthur Conan Doyle’s original manuscripts. There was information on the science of crime solving during this point in history and on the fascination with crime present culturally that provided a background for the novels.

The central part of the exhibit was the opportunity to solve your own crime using the tools of the time. Although probably not targeted entirely toward adults, we both had fun following the clues and solving the mystery.

From there, we made our way to Orfeo, the meeting place for our Savor Seattle Gourmet Seattle Tour. This would be my third tour with Savor Seattle and like the previous two, it did not disappoint.

But first, we had to stop for cupcakes. We arrived just a bit early for the tour, so when we asked about somewhere nearby to grab a quick drink, our guide recommend Yellow Leaf Cupcakes. Because if you’re going to drink water, you might as well have a pancakes and bacon cupcake to go with it.

Back at Orfeo, our tour began. The focus of the Gourmet Tour is the food culture of Seattle – the focus on fresh, local, organic, seasonal, and sustainable foods. At each stop of the tour, we got to sample varying ways that Seattle restaurants live out these goals with a selection of small plates and Washington wine pairings. And it was delicious!

Wild Boar Polenta
One of the interesting things about Orfeo, in addition to the food, was the art. All of the art in the restaurant is a derivative of a single painting. For instance, in the picture below, the decor along the wall is enlarged pieces of the painting.

The second stop was a kitchen table at Serious Pie for some of the best pizza in Seattle

Then it was Cutter’s Crab House for crab stuffed prawns

And then La Buona Tavola, aka the truffle store, aka the most delicious place on earth

Then it was on to the Steelhead Diner for to-die-for razor clam chowder

And we still weren’t finished. Our next to last stop was Von’s Gustrobistro, famous for their collection of well over 1,000 spirits and their sourdough based breads and pasta
Here we were treated to an unbelievably delicious salmon sourdough pasta
The final stop of the walking tour was the iconic Fran’s Chocolates where we got to enjoy a variety of chocolate tastings that beautifully rounded out the tour

Following the tour, we were somehow hungry for dinner. We returned to Brandon’s favorite stop from the tour, Von’s, for more of that sourdough pasta. And more drinks. When it’s your birthday trip, you get to do what you want.

We started with sourdough bread with mozzarella
This time, we ordered the pork belly and brussel sprout pasta
The real highlight was the drinks. With fantastic ingredients and unique presentations, the drinks were hard to beat.

For further proof, here is a video, yes a video, of the coolest drink ever: video_31093318625

Our last major stop of the day was the Space Needle. Finally ready for a break from all of the eating, the Seattle icon was the perfect spot to finally put our feet up for a bit. With an unbeatable view of the city, we suddenly became the obnoxious couple kissing at a landmark. I know, I know, but there was Brandon and the romance of the city lights and the relaxed satisfaction of a day spent enjoying delicious food and drinks. I couldn’t not make out with him.

After that, we slowly made our way back to the ferry. We stopped at a bar or brewery here or there as caught our fancy. By the time we made it back to the ferry, it was late and we were exhausted. Which probably explains (some of) the following pictures.

It is hard to beat this view of Seattle at night

It was one of my favorite days ever.

Oh, and my new FitBit record

Tuesday was Brandon’s birthday. We used his birthday as an excuse to be lazy. To relax. To enjoy the hot tub to soothe our aching feet. We checked into the Inn at Pleasant Beach and simply enjoyed the beauty of the day and each other’s company. I know taking a day to relax can seem like a waste while on vacation, but I’ve learned that a day like this makes the rest of the trip so much better. We ended the day with an unparalleled birthday dinner at Manor House (more on that to come).

Wednesday was sadly our last day on Bainbridge Island.

We made the most of our last morning before heading toward Portland. While our time in Washington may have been about new experiences, we used our time in Portland to revisit some of our favorites. Dinner at Le Chon is always a highlight. And one of Brandon’s favorite spots is Ground Kontrol – arcade by day and arcade and bar by night. He usually beats me at everything. Except Tetris, I dominate at Tetris. And a late night in Portland is not quite complete without a stop by Voodoo Donut. Because it was a weeknight, there was hardly a line at all!

And then came Thursday. The last day is always the hardest, especially when the days ends with your love flying away for work. But we made the most of it. After breakfast, we spent a leisurely morning at the Japanese Gardens, lovely despite the ongoing construction.

I love this picture of Brandon

Our last stop of the day and the vacation was McMenamin’s Grand Lodge in Forest Grove. We booked massages for the afternoon at Ruby’s Spa and spent the time before and after in the warm soaking pool. It was the perfect end to a perfect week together.

But I’m not done, yet. I have more to share about food and the places you should definitely eat should you find yourself in Bainbridge or Portland. Because I have not already talked enough about food.

What I Ate in North Carolina

I would normally have more to share than a handful of restaurants after visiting a new place. Alas, because I was in North Carolina for a conference, I actually had to work. I spent most of my days in hotel conference rooms, soaking in the interesting and informative lectures. In between learning, I did manage to fit in a few delicious meals.

Of course, the plan was to spend the partial day I had before the conference exploring a bit. That plan was rather disrupted when housekeeping knocked on my door that morning. Somewhat baffled by housekeeping bothering me quite so early in the morning, I looked at the clock. Only to realize that it was after 11 pm. Jet lag, man. So, not quite so much time to explore, but, with my first trip to NC, I did get to enjoy legit fried chicken, actual sweet tea, and still-warm-from-the-oven cornbread (oh how I miss Southern food). I visited a charming French bakery, chowed down on wood-fired pizza, and met up with college friends for dinner.  Although I spent most of my time either at the conference or eating, I did also find time to stop in at a fantastic and accessible museum.

Without further ado, here is my quick overview of places (okay, mostly restaurants) to visit if you find yourself in Charlotte, NC. I am so glad to have friends who make such great recommendations!

Mert’s Heart and Soul: When I think of things I miss about the South, home cooked Southern food is high on the list. In fact, it is probably right behind friends and family on the list and well above the weather. Which might not be on the list at all, as a matter of fact. Being in NC, I knew I would not be getting quite the home cooked experience, but Mert’s came pretty darn close. My co-workers and I headed there upon a recommendation from my friends in NC and I do not think anyone regretted the choice. I went all out, choosing fried chicken, macaroni and cheese, and okra and tomatoes. With sweet tea of course. And the cornbread. Oh the cornbread. I could write poems about the cornbread. This is definitely a place to check out while in Charlotte.

The good stuff

Amelie’s: Another recommendation from a friend, this seemed like the perfect spot for lunch after waking up a little later than intended that morning. From the moment one walks in the door, it is hard to not be completely charmed by this spacious and unique bakery. And the food was perhaps even more impressive than the decor. My choice (not an easy one, to be sure) was the chicken salad sandwich and a side of truffle potato salad. You had me at truffle. Oh, and an iced coffee. Did I mention I was rather jet lagged? And you know I saved room for dessert. That was an even more difficult choice. Thankfully, many of the desserts came in a mini-size. The sole purpose of a mini-dessert’s existence is so that you can eat more of them without feeling guilty.

Life is full of difficult choices

Tupelo Honey: The fact that this is a chain restaurant did not make it any less delightful. Of course, that could have been the company, as well. One night while in NC, I had the privilege to meet up with two of my friends from college, who I had not seen since, well, college pretty much. I love that I have friends all over the US and the world. And that sometimes even when I am far away from home, I get the chance to see them. As I sat on the restaurant’s balcony, happily eating fried green tomatoes and “burnt” okra while enjoying the cool of the evening, I was so thankful to be spending an evening catching up with old friends.

Mama Ricotta’s: Although I could happily have eaten ALL the Southern food, this Italian restaurant was a nice change of pace for my last evening in NC. Fair warning if you decide to enjoy a meal here, this place was packed! Thankfully, my co-worker/friend and I got there in time for an early dinner. By the time we left there was a line out the door. And it was easy to see why. The food was fresh and authentic. With plenty of garlic. I don’t think there are many better food combos in the world than pizza, salad, and wine. There is, of course, turkey, dressing, and cranberry sauce, but that is for another time.

Levine Museum of the New South: Obviously, this is not a restaurant. Other than seeing what was to be seen walking around downtown Charlotte, this was the other non-food stop I experienced during my time in NC. I was, after all, there to actually attend a conference. Despite being non-conference related, I did learn as I perused the museum. The Levine Museum focuses on the history of the South, especially in and around NC, since the end of the Civil War. The main exhibit is interactive and engaging, even for an adult. It was well worth the time spent and the $8 entrance fee. I would recommend this as a stop to anyone visiting Charlotte.

Of course, there was more I would have liked to do while in Charlotte. But, I feel like I made the most of my time. And I got to attend a wonderful conference. I will not bore you with the details of that. Just trust me on the food.

Let’s Go Back to February

So in all of the hubbub about Iceland, which, to be sure, certainly deserves all of the love, I never got a chance to discuss Valentine’s Day and the new progress on my Oregon Bucket List.

Let me start by saying that I’m not necessarily a Valentine’s Day kind of gal. I don’t expect flowers and romance and gifts just because it is a certain day. I do sort of expect those things at other times, but because they come from the heart, not from some sort of weird pressure to win the unspoken competition that occurs on Valentine’s Day to have the “best” boyfriend, husband, partner, etc.

That being said, when your boyfriend has been out of town for three weeks because of work and he just happens to be back the weekend that it just happens to be Valentine’s Day, it is the perfect excuse for a weekend getaway.

In typical Brandon and Cora fashion, the weekend mostly centered around food. Really, really good food.

We kicked off the weekend by trying one of the restaurants on my bucket list: Ned Ludd.

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The restaurant managed to exude coziness, quirkiness, and Portland all at the same time.

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With a focus on locally sourced ingredients and homestyle craft cooking using the restaurant’s brick wood-fired oven, the experience was overwhelmingly delicious. The menu changes regularly to reflect the season.

Something with gin, honey, and lemon and something with cranberry and some type of liqour? That's all I've got. Sometimes I get too distracted by, you know, actually drinking a delicious cocktail to remember to note what's in it.
Something with gin, honey, and lemon and something with cranberry and some type of liqour? That’s all I’ve got. Sometimes I get too distracted by, you know, actually drinking a delicious cocktail to remember to note what’s in it.
This was the only thing I did not enjoy - the gougeres (you can google it yourself, just like I did subtly under the table in the restaurant) were excellent, but the pink peppercorn cream was just a little too, well, peppery.
This was the only thing I did not enjoy – the gougeres (you can google it yourself, just like I did, with my phone hid subtly under the table) were excellent, but the pink peppercorn cream (in keeping with the red and pink themed Valentine’s menu) was just a little too, well, peppery.
Homemade noodles, sautéed kale and other greens with a poached egg and parmesan. It never tastes this good when I make it at home.
Homemade noodles, sautéed kale and other greens with a poached egg and parmesan. It never tastes this good when I make it at home.
Brandon ordered polenta with roasted brussels sprouts and mushrooms. Maybe my vegetarian diet is rubbing off on him?
Brandon ordered polenta with roasted brussels sprouts and mushrooms.
And no fancy meal is complete without dessert - a warm chocolate cookie with cold milk. The cold milk comes from a specific cow. A specific cow that has a name.
And no fancy meal is complete without dessert – a warm chocolate chocolate chip cookie with cold milk. The cold milk comes from a specific cow. A specific cow that has a name. Did I mention that we were in Portland?

Ned Ludd is not my favorite restaurant in Portland (more on that in a bit), but it was an excellent meal in a restaurant committed to every aspect of the food that they serve.

You can’t spend a weekend in Portland without doing brunch. It’s just what you do in Portland. After deciding we didn’t want to wait for two hours to get a table at Tasty n Alder, we found ourselves at Cheryl’s on 12th, which had a much more reasonable wait.

Not only was there a shorter wait, there were also complimentary beignet like things, warm out of the oven and coated in sugar. I think we made a good choice.
Not only was there a shorter wait, there were also complimentary beignet like things, warm out of the oven and coated in sugar. I think we made a good choice.
I do not apologize for the gratuitous picture of handsome brunch date
I do not apologize for the gratuitous picture of my handsome brunch date
It's not brunch without coffee. And mimosas. And more coffee.
It’s not brunch without coffee. And mimosas. And more coffee.
Eggs Sardou made with creamed spinach and artichokes
Eggs Sardou made with creamed spinach and artichokes

And the delicious food did not stop there. Saturday evening, we ate at our favorite Portland restaurant, where we had first eaten back in October. Lechon is just plain amazing. Serving food inspired by South American cuisine, Lechon simply gets it right.

This is the Mediterraneo - a drink inspired by the classic Peruvian cocktail - the pisco sour
This is the Mediterraneo – a drink similar to the classic Peruvian cocktail, the pisco sour

On this particular evening, we decided to order the special Valentine’s tasting menu. Every single bite was amazing. And by that I mean I want to eat it all again. Right now.

Salad with goat cheese, toasted nuts, cranberries, and a champagne vinaigrette
A salad with creamed goat cheese, toasted pine nuts, cranberries, and a champagne vinaigrette
This is what food should always taste like - burrata on toast with roasted salsa
This is what food should always taste like – burrata on toast with charred salsa
Lobster beignets
Lobster beignets
This truffle risotto was so incredible that my amazing boyfriend has learned to replicate it at home. Because everyone needs truffle risotto in their life on a regular basis.
This truffle risotto was so incredible that my amazing boyfriend has learned to replicate it at home. Because everyone needs truffle risotto in their life on a regular basis.
After all of that, we finally got to the main course - swordfish with chimichurri, crab cakes, and beef stuffed with all kinds of yummy things like olives and peppers
After all of that, we finally got to the main course – swordfish with chimichurri, crab cakes, and beef stuffed with all kinds of yummy things like olives and peppers
And, because we had not eaten enough already, we each got our own (as in no sharing) molten lava cakes for dessert.
And, because we had not eaten enough already, we each got our own (as in no sharing) molten lava cake for dessert.

Okay, so we obviously ate a lot of really good food. But we actually did other stuff, too. A walking tour is the perfect after dinner activity to burn off at least some of the calories consumed. I had taken a tour with Portland Walking Tours a couple years ago and really enjoyed it. This seemed like a perfect opportunity to try one of their other tours. After looking into my options, I settled on the Beyond Bizarre Ghost Tour, which offered a combination of history for me and the potential for scariness for Brandon. With a 10 pm start time, there was plenty of time for a late dinner before meeting for the tour at the former Merchant Hotel, which is rumored to be haunted (said in my most mysterious and scary movie voiceover voice).

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Haunted or not, it was creepy. Especially the creepy, creepy basement that was part of the infamous Portland tunnels underneath the city.

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Our guide was fantastic – funny and informative!

What I like about this type of tour is that you get a side of history that you don’t normally hear. Even if ghosts aren’t your thing (and it’s not really mine), we got to learn about the darker side of Portland history – essentially legalized forced prostitution and the horrors associated with it, a period of time when anyone could be kidnapped and forced to be a sailor, floods and murder and mayhem.

We got to use EMF detectors during the tour. I will say, it was a little unnerving when it lit up. Especially in the creepy, creepy basement.
We got to use EMF detectors during the tour. I will say, it was a little unnerving when it lit up. Especially in the creepy, creepy basement.

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Another gratuitous boyfriend picture. Because that smile.
Another gratuitous boyfriend picture. Because that smile.

Toward the end of the tour, our guide surprised us with a stop by Voodoo Doughnut (also on my bucket list, although I had previously been there).

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Best of all, we got to surpass the hour-long line.

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So much for burning those calories…

The other fun thing we did was OMSI After Dark. This adults only event is a (usually) once a month event when the museum stays open late. There are themed events, vendors, and exhibits with a different focus each month.

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Appropriately, the theme this night was related to love and relationships. I thought the concept was great – extra museum hours and the opportunity to spend those extra hours perusing exhibits, glass of wine in hand. However, the execution was somewhat lacking. It was just so darn crowded. Every single thing had a line to the point I felt like we spent the whole evening waiting in line. I would have gladly paid more for the tickets (I think they were $20 apiece) if it meant that entry to OMSI After Dark was capped after a certain number of people.

If I had to wait in line, at least I got to do it with this guy.
If I had to wait in line, at least I got to do it with this guy.
Sexy
I think it’s a good look

Valentine’s or not, I would eat delicious food and explore scary places (like creepy, creepy basements and crowded museums) with Brandon anytime.

A Wintery Week in Iceland: Museums

I have a confession to make. I like museums. Which, let’s be honest, is probably not all that surprising. During my trip to Iceland, I had the opportunity to visit three museums and learn more about the history of Iceland.

Árnessýsla Heritage Museum – The House at Eyrarbakki

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Built in 1765, this is one of the oldest (still standing) houses in Iceland. It now houses a museum focused on the history of the house and the coastal town surrounding it.

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By far the weirdest thing in the museum was this set of clothing knit from the maker’s own hair. I wasn’t sure whether to be disgusted or impressed.

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Skogar Museum

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This was my favorite museum that I visited. I could have spent most of the day here. The collection of approximately 15,000 local artifacts was impressive for many reasons, not the least of which was that the items were all collected by or given to a now 94-year-old man. This is the personal collection of a man passionate about his region’s history.

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Our guide through the museum provided a fascinating history of the hardships faced by the Icelanders as they settled the country. It was a place that was beautiful, but brutal. To survive required hardiness and creativity – bowls made out of whale vertebrae, shoes made out of fish. Survival in this place was hard won.

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The oldest printed Bible in Iceland. Literacy for the average Icelander was common long before it became usual elsewhere in Europe. In fact, the ancient sagas were written by Icelanders for Icelanders, not by or for the elite few who could read. Literacy was the rule, not the exception. 
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Oh, and as a bonus, there was a super cute dog
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An askur is a traditional Icelandic bowl. Typically made of driftwood (because there were not many other options), the bowls were used for a bit of everything, only one of which was eating.
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Fish shoes wore out quickly, but knitted insoles lasted much longer, thus making them a traditional courtship gift from a woman to a man.

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Outside of the main building were other examples of Icelandic buildings, including traditional turf houses.

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If you stop here, and you should, definitely plan on spending more than the brief hour I had to spend.

Viking World

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As the name suggests, the museum is focused on the history of the Vikings and their role in settling Iceland (although the Nordic people came as setters and farmers, not raiders).

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The highlight of the museum is the Íslendingur. The two story exhibit of the Viking ship discusses the ship’s journey in 2000 to recreate the original Viking voyage of Leif Ericsson to Newfoundland.

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This museum is relatively small and does not take long to peruse, but provides a quick history that gives a greater context for understanding the early history of Iceland.

So, there you have it. A small handful of museum to consider visiting while in Iceland. With more time in Reykjavik, I would have also liked to visit the National Gallery, The National Museum, The Settlement Exhibition, and perhaps the Culture House or The Saga Museum. Another time…